Tag Archives: agriculture

New Volunteers from the U.S. Dept. of Interior Bureau  of Land Management

Rebuild Dominica Inc. is pleased to announce two new  volunteers: husband and wife team, Corey and Chantel Grant of the US Dept. of Interior Bureau  of Land Management. They have agreed  to aid Rebuild Dominica in launching a Youth Conservation Corps on Dominica.

The Youth Conservation Corps will be dedicated to soil conservation, river course and marine environment preservation and management, alongside nature trail maintenance and reforestation. All those areas of the national territory in Dominica are in acute need of attention following the deadly floods during Hurricane Maria, which caused great destruction of Dominica’s tree cover in addition to massive soil erosion.

Rebuild Dominica is eternally grateful to those Dominicans and those of other nations who have rallied to aid our island and other sister Caribbean nations greatly in need of disaster following the most awful hurricane season of 2017.

The proposed Youth Conservation Corps will be a non-government/private sector youth  community development entity supported by private sector initiatives at home and abroad. Rebuild Dominica intends to partner with the Government of Dominica’s Division of Forestry, Wildlife and Agriculture wherever and whenever  possible.
Some of the proponents of the Youth Conservation Corps, such as Major Francis Richards, have had experience in the Dominica Cadet Corps program, which started on Dominica in 1910.  For more details, visit http://www.dominicacadets.org.

University of Maryland at Eastern Shore: Food Preservation Program

The food preservation program was held at the Dominica Grammar School in May 2016 by food scientists from the University of Maryland at Eastern Shore; Dr. Patel and Dr. Nando.

The Dominica Grammar School (DGS) is a public co-education secondary school in Roseau, Dominica, which was established in 1893. It is one of the oldest educational institutions on the island and no longer functions as a traditional grammar school. It has expanded its curriculum beyond its historical scope.

The scientists taught Dominican farmers and entrepreneurs food preservation technology focusing on mango preserves.

Dr. Patel, featured in the above video, can be seen teaching the food processing class in The Commonwealth of Dominica to the attendees at the Dominica Grammar School.

Their program was part of the memorandum of understanding with the University of Maryland at Eastern Shore and Dominica facilitated by Rebuild Dominica, Inc. in collaboration with the Dominica State College, the Caribbean Agricultural Network and the local Global Environment Fund.

Above is an interview feature of one of the attendees during the program, Dylan Williams.

 Remembering the Victims of Tropical Storm Erika

Koudmen - Post Erika

 Remembering the Victims of Tropical Storm Erika

Rebuild Dominica Inc. Continues to Highlight Reconstruction Efforts

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE

Washington, D.C. (August 27, 2016) – Today marks the one-year anniversary of the devastating floods which wreaked havoc on the beautiful Nature Island of the Caribbean. We remember the many lives lost during Tropical Storm Erika and look ahead in order to pay respects to their memory. What better way to celebrate the Dominicans who lost their lives than to stand together in solidarity. Rebuild Dominica, Inc. forges ahead in the nonprofit’s support of reconstruction on The Commonwealth of Dominica.

One such advancement is the partnership with the University of Maryland at Eastern Shore (UMES) which will offer a $5,000 USD scholarship to Caribbean islanders and International students who register as students of UMES. The grant will assist with out-of-state tuition fees. An additional partnership between Dominica State College and UMES was also formed this year. Rebuild Dominica, Inc. similarly encourages UMES to aid Dominica’s agricultural processing competence on-island. Two Food Technology professors from UMES visited Dominica in May to teach an agro-processing seminar on food preservation (May 18 – 20). This partnership will be shared with other Caribbean nations to continue the spirit of community exhibited during TS Erika relief.

Furthermore, Rebuild Dominica, Inc. continues its fundraising campaign to provide much-needed uniforms and gear for the Cadet Corps units in Dominica. A donation of recycled military uniforms was received by Dominican-born and retired U.S. military veteran, Dorival Drigo. The donation will be shipped in the coming month via Caribbean Cargo DC; a long-time sponsor of the organization. The shipment will be the first of many supplies to benefit the Dominica Cadet Corps whose spirit of courage reflect the spirit of its people.

A more recent development is the newly formed Dominican Association for the Washington D.C., Maryland and Virginia area which launched on June 6th 2016. Their mission is to create a forum/social club where all Dominicans located in in the D.C., Maryland, and Virginia area may join to uplift and support the development of their homeland through educational, cultural, and charitable initiatives. The association’s first meeting will be held in Silver Spring, Maryland on Saturday, September 17th 2016.

“Folks, we are on our way. Let us persevere in the path of victory!” proclaimed Gabriel Christian during Rebuild Dominica, Inc.’s board meeting a few days prior to the eve of anniversary of TS Erika. The path that is true and faithful will not be easy. As The Commonwealth of Dominica continues reconstruction efforts, members of the Diaspora and supporters of The Commonwealth of Dominica are invited to share information and resources by visiting http://www.RebuildDominica.org.

About Rebuild Dominica, Inc.

Rebuild Dominica, Inc. is a registered 501(c)(3) non-profit organization based in Washington, DC. Its mission is to raise and distribute funds, expertise and material resources in support of the recovery and reconstruction efforts of communities on The Commonwealth of Dominica that were impacted by floods from TS Erika.

Rebuild Dominica, Inc. aims to make a sustainable, long term impact, and focuses on programs that address the unmet needs of communities around Dominica. The organization is inspired by the spirit of volunteerism, team work and cooperative self-help. Dominica has a long heritage of working together for the common good. In Dominica’s French creole language, those values of community self-help have a name; it is called: Koudmen. Rebuild Dominica serves to personify this spirit of Koudmen.

Rebuild Dominica Partners With The Global Breadfruit Institute

As the journey to reconstruction continues, Rebuild Dominica forms a new partnership with the Global Breadfruit Institute to boost recovery efforts. This partnership follows the donation of advanced breadfruit cultivars from Dr. Julius Garvey, the son of the late great Marcus Mosiah Garvey, who also committed to agricultural reconstruction efforts.

Breadfruit Tissue Culture
Breadfruit Tissue Culture

The Global Breadfruit Institute advised they were aware of Rebuild Dominica’s international campaign to support The Commonwealth of Dominica following the damage caused by Tropical Storm Erika. To support this campaign, Global Breadfruit was inspired to provide a generous gift of 1,500 breadfruit trees.

The above video provides a glimpse of the breadfruit plants at the Dominica Ministry of Agriculture greenhouse. The video is narrated by Errol Emmanuel, Rebuild Dominica (RD)  member on island and Director of the Caribbean Agricultural Network: a collaborating organization to Rebuild Dominica.

In a statement of support to Rebuild Dominica’s efforts to revive agriculture on-island post Erika, Blair Lampert of Global Breadfruit stated, “This collaboration with Rebuild Dominica is part of a long-term effort, which unites local public and private entities engaged in business, research, agriculture, and welfare that will rely on Rebuild Dominica to proliferate optimal breadfruit varieties island-wide.” A sentiment shared by supporters of Dominica’s recovery.

Dr. Diane Ragone | Global Breadfruit
Dr. Diane Ragone | Global Breadfruit

A previous donation of breadfruit trees by the admirable Dr. Julius Garvey arrived in Dominica in the weeks preceding Tropical Storm Erika. This additional gift from the Global Breadfruit Institute is beneficial in furthering the mission of Rebuild Dominica. To learn more about the initial donation, the following excerpt from the Caribbean Agricultural Network’s (CAN) August 2015 press release is provided below:

According to the CEO of the Caribbean Agricultural Network (CAN) Major Francis Richards, the cultivars (Ulu-fiti) and (Otea) are the donation of New York based General Surgeon Dr Julius Garvey, the last son of Marcus Garvey.

At the end of the hardening process, the objective of the project is to distribute the plants within the seven (7) agricultural regions on island. Upon arrival the cultivars will be transported to the Ministry of Agriculture’s greenhouse facility at Portsmouth where they will be hardened for three months prior to distribution to local farmers. The advanced cultivar types sent to Dominica are fast bearing and will fruit within 2 to 3 years, compared to the standard 3 to 5 years.

Dr. Garvey is a member of the Caribbean Agricultural Network and has dedicated himself to the development of Caribbean food security, in accordance with the principles of self reliance advocated by his father who founded the Universal Negro Improvement Association in the early 1900s. Dominica was a major base of support for the UNIA during its early years and Marcus Garvey himself was invited to Dominica in 1929 with the aid of UNIA representative, noted local poet and self rule activist JR Ralph Casimir.

Breadfruit Plants in Potting Medium
Breadfruit Plants in Potting Medium

Read the full press release on the first donation from Dr. Garvey online at http://www.caribbeanagriculturalnetwork.com/2015/08/donation-of-advanced-breadfruit.html

 

This write-up was prepared by the Media Relations Team at Rebuild Dominica. For more information regarding this post, contact LaDàna Drigo at 202.670.6489 or info@AbovePrestigePR.com.

A Case for Improved Soil and Land Use Management in Dominica

Dominica’s national motto “Après Bondie C’est La Ter” meaning “after God is the land” highlights the importance of the land (the soil) to Island. The amount of precious top soil eroded by the torrential rains during the Erika disaster may never be quantified or featured among all we have lost. Nonetheless, losses incurred due to landslides and soil erosion and the subsequent impact on communities and livelihoods highlight the need to elevate the importance of soil and land use management in Dominica.

landslide-pic-1

The 68th United Nations General Assembly declared 2015 as the International Year of Soil. A primary objective was to raise awareness among civil society and decision makers of the profound importance of soils for human life. As a non-renewable resource, its preservation is paramount for food security and our sustainable future.
Soils are not merely parcels of uniform materials. Instead, they are units with characteristics that change vertically downwards through different layers and horizontally in every direction. Therefore, to describe a soil it is not sufficient to only look at the surface, a vertical cut or boring must be made and the different layers from the surface to the parent material (underlying rock) carefully examined.

The soils of Dominica were classified by Mr. David Lang over 40 years ago. His work provides general descriptions of the major soil types, soil forming processes and includes several important recommendations for land use planning and agricultural development. Mostly, the soils are formed by the weathering of volcanic rock. The weathering process results in the formation of clays and secondary minerals. However, the unique properties of the respective soil types are based on the underlying rock and as influenced by environmental factors, rainfall patterns, topography, vegetation and the extent of weathering.

landslide-pic-2

The physical and chemical characteristics of our soils, suitability for agriculture and other land uses are largely dependent on the type and quantity of clay they contain. For example, soils along the west coast between Jimmit and Tarreau dominated by Smectite clay minerals are noted for their shrinking and swelling properties. They shrink and crack considerably when dry and expand when wet. This activity is responsible for the cracks and movement frequently observed in the paved roads in that area. The Smectoid clays differ from soils on the north east, around Marigot, which are dominated by Kandite clay minerals. Kandoid clays are generally highly weathered (older), appear reddish to red-brown, are well-drained and better suited for agricultural development.

Several studies have investigated the mechanics of landslides in Dominica. The steep slopes, high rainfall and high water holding capacity of our soils are some of the factors that predispose many parts of the island to landslides. While heavy rainfalls are common in Dominica, it is the prolonged precipitation at high intensities, as occurred with Erika, which is capable of causing serious destruction from landslides.

landslide-pic-3

Efforts to rebuild Dominica must be focused on building resilience and adapting to climate change impacts. Soil conservation and land use planning based on available technologies and the findings and recommendations generated from scientific studies (most of which already exist) should guide policy decisions and inform activities at the farm and community levels. We must also rely on the practical experience of individuals who have continued in the traditions of our forefathers, by stabilizing slopes with deep rooting crop and forest trees, bamboo and vetiver strips and who willingly adopt the approach that some extra work now can set the foundation for a sustainable future.

Davidson Lloyd (PhD)